6th Grade and up Lesson Plans

USCGC TAMPA MURAL
Nancy Dalence: Director of Education

MacDill Air Force Base and World War II
Amanda Hoffman: Programs Manager

Florida History – The USCGC Tampa

This lesson plan complements the following grade-level standards.

11th:  SS.912.A.1.2; SS.912.A.3; SS.9.12.A.1.4;  SS.912.A.3.4;  SS.912.A.4.1;  SS.912.A.4.11;  SS.912.A.4.3;  SS.912.A.4.4;  SS.912.A.4.5;  SS.912.A.4.7;  SS.912.A.4.8;  LAFS.1112.RH.1.1;  LAFS.111.RH.1.2;  LAFS.1112.RH.2.5;  LAFS.1112.RH.3.7;  LAFS.1112.RH.3.9

LESSON PLAN OVERVIEW

Lesson Overview:  The USCGC Tampa has secured its place in our local history for its role in pageantry, protection, and patriotism in the early 20th century. This history significantly reflects events on the national stage. The lesson activities utilize content from TBHC’s textbook:  USCGC Tampa, Tampa’s Own. The book has also been made available online. By using primary sources, including images newspapers, photographs, letters, videos, along with background information, students will explore the proud role of the Tampa.

9-12th Grades:

11th:  SS.912.A.1.2; SS.912.A.3; SS.9.12.A.1.4;  SS.912.A.3.4;  SS.912.A.4.1;  SS.912.A.4.11;  SS.912.A.4.3;  SS.912.A.4.4;  SS.912.A.4.5;  SS.912.A.4.7;  SS.912.A.4.8;  LAFS.1112.RH.1.1;  LAFS.111.RH.1.2;  LAFS.1112.RH.2.5;  LAFS.1112.RH.3.7;  LAFS.1112.RH.3.9

Activity 1.  1917…What’s Going on
Activity 2.  Off to the Ice Patrol
Activity 3.  Our Tampa Boys
Activity 4.  The Tampa:  A Proud History Pieced Together

1917…What’s Going On?

Students will understand the roles that Tampa has played in World War One starting in the crucial year of 1917 by examining and evaluating different primary sources.  Students will demonstrate how local events reflected what was happening nationally as the country was preparing itself for World War One.

Activity #1 - 1917 ... What's Going On?

 

 

Lesson Essential Question:  How does the history of the USCGC Tampa relate to national events?

Objective: Students will understand the roles that Tampa has played in World War One starting in the crucial year of 1917 by examining and evaluating different primary sources.  Students will demonstrate how local events reflected what was happening nationally as the country was preparing itself for World War One.

Materials:
• Link to online textbook, USCGC Tampa, Tampa’s Own:
https://www.dropbox.com/s/ha7sjsbm7eo6mpf/booksofar.pdf?dl=0
• Essay Instructions
• Primary source images:
1. Tampa Morning Tribune Headline
2. President Wilson speech
3. Coast Guard recruitment flyer with photo of Tampa crew
4. WWI propaganda: War Bonds and Red Cross
• Analyzing Primary Sources Worksheet

Instructions:
1. Students will read the textbook for background information on what was happening in Tampa in 1917 as the United States was entering WWI.
2. Have students view a selection of primary sources, including documents, photographs, posters, and newspapers. Using the Analyzing Primary Sources Worksheet, guide students in their investigation of each source to better understand the events of 1917 and how Tampa and its citizens were preparing for war.
3. For additional support, they can answer the Think About It questions for each source.


 

Analyzing Primary Sources Worksheet

Directions: Use the following graphic organizer to organize your thoughts as you study a primary source.


 

Tampa Morning Tribune, April 6, 1917

Think about it:
1. Note the different headlines related to the war. In what ways is the nation preparing?


 

President Woodrow Wilson speaks before Congress on entering World War I, April 2nd, 1917

Think about it:
1. Does the President seem eager or hesitant to lead the United States into war? Why do you think so?


Coast Guard Recruitment flyer and photo of crewmen of the USCGC Tampa

Think about it:
1. What details of the flyer indicate the urgent need for recruiting men for the Coast Guard?

2. What does the photo say about the character of the Tampa’s crew?


WWI Homefront Propaganda posters encouraging national support – Liberty Loan and the Red Cross

A Liberty bond (or liberty loan) was a war bond that was sold in the United States to support the Allied cause in World War I. Subscribing to the bonds became a symbol of patriotic duty in the United States and introduced the idea of financial securities to many citizens for the first time. The same is true for Tampan’s who participated in drives for the Red Cross.

Think about it:
1. What is the purpose of each image? What do they use to try to convince or encourage?

2. How are you meant to feel when you see these images

Off to the Ice Patrol

Students will use primary sources to examine the duty of the Tampa to protect ships from danger and reflect upon its service.

Activity #2 - Off to the Ice Patrol

 

 

Lesson Essential Question: How did the USCGC Tampa play a significant role of protection throughout its history?

Objective: Students will use primary sources to examine the duty of the Tampa to protect ships from danger and reflect upon its service.

Materials:
• Link to online textbook, USCGC Tampa, Tampa’s Own:https://www.dropbox.com/s/ha7sjsbm7eo6mpf/booksofar.pdf?dl=0
• Video simulation of the Titanic striking the iceberg: https://tampabayhistorycenter.org/videos/#USS-Tampa
• Homemade International Ice Patrol Flag
• Tampa Morning Tribune Article September 30, 1916
• Background info on International Ice Patrol Today

Instructions:
1. Students will read USCGC Tampa, Tampa’s Own, and the Background information on International Ice Patrol Today. Ask students what other ways are people protected today? Does protection necessarily have to be provided by the military?

2. Students will open the YouTube link and view the short video simulation of the Titanic iceberg collision. Discuss with students that there are tragedies in history that could have been avoided, and the sinking of the Titanic on April 15th, 1912 is a perfect example. Have students brainstorm what tragedies have occurred in their lifetime that could also be avoided. Ask students what measures have been taken so that they do not occur again?

3. Have students view the photos on pages 8 and 9 of the text. Ask how they describe the experience office patrol? Students may also view the ice patrol route on page 29 for additional info. Have the students write a journal entry as a sailor aboard the Tampa on ice patrol. Have them reflect upon their experiences and the importance of their mission.

Extension: Have students view the homemade International Ice Patrol Flag. Have students design their own flag based on their experiences as a sailor aboard the Tampa.


 

Analyzing Primary Sources Worksheet

Directions: Use the following graphic organizer to organize your thoughts as you study a primary source.


 

Tampa Morning Tribune, September 30, 1916


 

Homemade International Ice Patrol Flag


International Ice Patrol Today

Share this information from the Coast Guard Website with your students. What started as a job for the Coast Guard (Revenue Cutter Service) after the Titanic sunk in 1912 is still a responsibility of the Coast Guard over 100 years later.

MISSION: Monitor the iceberg danger in the North Atlantic Ocean and provide relevant iceberg warning products to the maritime community.

VISION: Eliminate the risk of iceberg collision. CORE PURPOSE: Promote safe navigation of the Northwest Atlantic Ocean when the danger of iceberg collisions exists. OUR OPERATIONS: The ice season runs from February 1st through July 31, during which the U.S. Coast Guard International Ice Patrol actively patrols the area of the Grand Banks of Newfoundland for the extent of iceberg danger. During the offseason, this responsibility is transferred to the Canadian Ice Service, which works closely with the International Ice Patrol under the North American Ice Service (NAIS). This partnership ensures accurate products are delivered to mariners year-round. The 1992 season, the longest on record, ran from March 7th through September 26th, 203 days. Except during unusually heavy ice years, the Grand Banks are normally free of ice from August through January. The activities of the International Ice Patrol are delineated by treaty and U.S. law to encompass only those ice regions of the North Atlantic Ocean through which the major trans-Atlantic tracks pass. There remain other areas of ice danger where shipping must exercise extreme caution. A tragic example of this occurred on January 30, 1959, when S.S. HANSHEDTOFT struck an iceberg about 40 miles south of Cape Farewell, Greenland. On her maiden voyage, this ship, equipped with the latest electronic aids, sank without a trace, taking with it the 95 passengers and crew on board.

Fixed-wing Coast Guard aircraft conduct the primary reconnaissance work for the Ice Patrol. Ice reconnaissance flights are made on an average of five days every other week during the ice season. The mainstay of the Ice Patrol flights since 1962 has been the C-130 long-range surveillance aircraft. IIP is currently using the HC-130J model operated out of Elizabeth City, NC. The usual patrol time for these long-range multi-engine planes is between 5 to 7 hours, with each flight covering an expanse of water of 30,000 square miles or more. Information concerning ice conditions is collected primarily from air surveillance flights and ships operating in or passing through the ice area. All the iceberg data are fed into a computer model at the IIP Operations Center along with ocean current and wind data. Using this information, the model predicts the drift of the icebergs. Each day, the predicted iceberg locations are used to estimate the iceberg limit. This limit is incorporated into our daily products, the NAIS Iceberg Bulletin and NAIS Iceberg Chart. These products are available to users and the general public by several means, including INMARSAT SafetyNet, NAVTEX, SITOR, and the world-wide-web. Except for the years of the two World Wars, the International Ice Patrol has conducted each season since 1913. During the period, the Ice Patrol has amassed an enviable safety record with not a single reported loss of life or property due to collision with an iceberg outside the advertised limit in the vicinity of the Grand Banks. However, the potential for a catastrophe still exists, as evidenced by numerous collisions with icebergs by ships transiting through the Ice Patrol iceberg limit through the years. You may view the history of the International Ice Patrol in more detail in our IIP History section.

Our Tampa Boys

Students will be able to reflect upon the history of the Tampa through the eyes of people who lived at the time.

Activity #3 - Our Tampa Boys

 

 

Lesson Essential Question: How do personal stories help us to understand the history of the USCGC Tampa?

Objective: Students will be able to reflect upon the history of the Tampa through the eyes of people who lived at the time. Students will analyze primary sources to interpret events and stories of actual people while comparing them to their own life and times.

Materials:
• Link to online textbook, USCGC Tampa, Tampa’s Own: https://www.dropbox.com/s/ha7sjsbm7eo6mpf/booksofar.pdf?dl=0
• Group Photo with Jimmy Ross
• Tony Pizzo article
• Gibraltar Postcard from Sumner Brothers 1918
• Sumner Brothers letter to home 1918

Instructions:
1. Students will read USCGC Tampa, Tampa’s Own for background information

2. Have the students imagine that there are no cell phones, no transatlantic phone service, no email, or Facebook. Have the students add items to the list of NO and DID NOT HAVE during the early 1900’s

3. Next, have students read the postcard from Gibraltar, and the letter from the Sumner Brothers serving aboard the Tampa. Ask: How long do you think it took for the postcard to get to their family? Do you think the letter reached their family before or after they died?

4. Discuss the use of newspapers for information. Remind students that there was no television much less cable news channels. Have students brainstorm, list and discuss where we get our information from today. Is it more or less accurate? Have students read the Tony Pizzo article about Jimmy Ross AKA Vicenzo Gurriero. Also have them look at the group photograph to see him with his hat pulled down over his face. Compare the two and guide them to where they will see that his name was listed as Jimmy Ross.

5. Have students list the important moments of their lives so far and the ones that they look forward to in their futures. What do they have to document these events? Ask them to be specific. How will their stories be remembered like the Sumner brother’s or Vicenzo Gurriero’s stories? How could they make sure that their story does go on? (i.e. handwritten journals, original artwork, etc.)


 

Postcard from Wamboldt and Homer Sumner, July 17, 1918


 

Letter to home from Wamboldt and Homer Sumner, September 6, 1918


 

Jimmy Ross AKA Vicenzo Gurriero standing, third from left.


Tony Pizzo article

The Tampa: A Proud History Pieced Together

Students will analyze art for its symbolism of historic meaning.

Activity #4 - History Pieced Together

 

 

Lesson Essential Question: How does art commemorate history?

Objective: Students will analyze art for its symbolism of historic meaning.

Materials:
• Link to TBHC video of the USCGC Tampa mural:https://tampabayhistorycenter.org/videos/#USS-Tampa
• Mural Analysis worksheet
• Seek and find – mural and symbol list
• Seek and find – answers

Instructions:
1. Students will first watch the TBHC video on the USCGC Tampa mural, Located on the west wall outside of the Tampa Bay History Center. They will learn about its glass mosaic construction and the symbolism that is used to tell the Tampa’s story.

2. Talk to students about why it is important to create something in dedication to a person, or events. Ask students about the different ways we do this today, and for different reasons.

3. Have students view the mural image. By using the Mural Analysis Worksheet, students will practice analyzing details.

4. Have students try the Seek and Find exercise to locate the symbols in the mural based on their observations and background information they have received.

 

USCGC TAMPA Mural Analysis Worksheet

Content: Take time to study the mural. Next, list the objects, people, places and action in the painting.

Describe the scenes in the mural thoroughly and impartially.

How are the elements of art (line, color, shape, space, and texture) used?

How does the composition “work” (through emphasis, unity, variety, rhythm, balance)?

Context: Consider what the mural tells you about the time and place in which it was made. State what you know about the world in which the artwork was created (history, culture, art historical information.

Think about how the mural relates to your own experience. What meanings (ideas, feelings, values) does it communicate to you?


 

Seek and find: In the mural image, try to find the symbols from the list.

Each symbol represents an important piece of the Tampa’s history.

USCGC Tampa on ice patrol
USCGC Tampa crest
Morning sky and evening sky
Brookwood American Cemetery Chapel honoring those lost at sea in WWI
Rock of Gibraltar
Coast Guard crest
Bristol Channel between Ireland and Great Britain
Date “1918”
Tampa Bay Hotel with minarets
Coast Guard WWI Memorial at Arlington Cemetery dedicated to the officers and men lost on the Tampa
Florida peninsula
Mocking bird
Convoy
Hibiscus
Pirate flag and Gasparilla ship
The Titanic
USCGC Tampa brothers, Algy and Arthur Bevins


 

Answer Key


1. Bristol Channel between Ireland and Great Britain
2. Date “1918”
3. Florida peninsula
4. Coast Guard crest
5. Hibiscus
6. USCGC Tampa on ice patrol
7. Mocking bird
8. Morning sky and evening sky
9. Pirate flag and Gasparilla ship
10. Rock of Gibraltar
11. The Titanic
12. Tampa Bay Hotel with minarets
13. USCGC Tampa brothers, Algy and Arthur Bevins
14. USCGC Tampa crest
15. Coast Guard WWI Memorial at Arlington Cemetery dedicated to the officers and men lost on the Tampa
16. Brookwood American Cemetery Chapel honoring those lost at sea in WWI
17. Convoy

801 Water Street, Tampa, FL 33602

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